Showing 3239 results

authority records
Johnson, Pamela
MS 119 · Person · 1920-1999

Pamela Johnson (nee Richards) was born to Norman and Pearl Richards of Salmon Arm at Hillcrest Poultry Farm November 3, 1920. She began school at Miss Codrington’s School for Young Ladies in Berkley, Gloucestershire England and then attended schools at Larch Hills and Salmon Arm.

Johnson furthered her education and trained at Royal Inland Hospital and Tranquille TB Sanatorium, graduating in 1943 as a Registered Nurse. Her career highlights include nursing at Royal Inland Hospital, crippled Children’s and Infant Hospitals and working for an armament company contracted with the British Admiralty as an Industrial Nurse during the WWII.

Johnson returned to Salmon Arm after the war before moving to Kelowna for work in 1945. She then worked in Dr. Cates’ office in Haney before starting a family with husband Robert Johnson, who she married August 22, 1950. They had three children together: Diane, Vivian and Doug. In 1962 the family relocated to Salmon Arm.

Johnson was an active member of the Anglican Women’s Guild and a founding member of the Church Thrift Shop in Salmon Arm. She enjoyed the outdoors and activities such as fishing, camping, dancing, tennis, curling, and golfing.

John Allan Wilson
MS 120 · Person · 1906-1983

John (Jack) Allan Wilson (1906 – 1983) was born in Virden, Manitoba. He moved to Salmon Arm in 1912, with his parents George and Alice Wilson, becoming one of the area’s pioneer residents. Wilson was educated in Salmon Arm and attended school in South Canoe.

On October 06, 1939, John married Tappen resident Marguerite (Peggy) Annala (1913-2002). Together, they had two children: John Allan and Robert George.

Wilson first worked as a banker, but then became a teacher and taught school in Kelowna, Princeton, and Salmon Arm from 1940-1958. Wilson also taught elementary school in the Salmon Arm area, including the schools Lee Creek, Tappen Valley, and Carlin.

As an active community member, Wilson enjoyed a variety of activities including photography and also sat on the board for the Salmon Arm Museum. He was a history buff and chronicled the history of the area in unpublished works. Wilson was an amateur archaeologist, collector and rockhound and had a keen interest in First Nations cultures. He was also involved in running the Adams River Sockeye Run programme, worked for the Co-op movement and was a former director of the Credit Union.

John Allan Wilson
MS 120 · Person

John (Jack) Allan Wilson (1906 – 1983) was born in Virden, Manitoba. He moved to Salmon Arm in 1912, with his parents George and Alice Wilson, becoming one of the area’s pioneer residents. Wilson was educated in Salmon Arm and attended school in South Canoe.

On October 06, 1939, John married Tappen resident Marguerite (Peggy) Annala (1913-2002). Together, they had two children: John Allan and Robert George.

Wilson first worked as a banker, but then became a teacher and taught school in Kelowna, Princeton, and Salmon Arm from 1940-1958. Wilson also taught elementary school in the Salmon Arm area, including the schools Lee Creek, Tappen Valley, and Carlin.

As an active community member, Wilson enjoyed a variety of activities including photography and also sat on the board for the Salmon Arm Museum. He was a history buff and chronicled the history of the area in unpublished works. Wilson was an amateur archaeologist, collector and rockhound and had a keen interest in First Nations cultures. He was also involved in running the Adams River Sockeye Run programme, worked for the Co-op movement and was a former director of the Credit Union.

John Allan Wilson
MS 120 · Person

John (Jack) Allan Wilson (1906 – 1983) was born in Virden, Manitoba. He moved to Salmon Arm in 1912, with his parents George and Alice Wilson, becoming one of the area’s pioneer residents. Wilson was educated in Salmon Arm and attended school in South Canoe.

On October 06, 1939, John married Tappen resident Marguerite (Peggy) Annala (1913-2002). Together, they had two children: John Allan and Robert George.

Wilson first worked as a banker, but then became a teacher and taught school in Kelowna, Princeton, and Salmon Arm from 1940-1958. Wilson also taught elementary school in the Salmon Arm area, including the schools Lee Creek, Tappen Valley, and Carlin.

As an active community member, Wilson enjoyed a variety of activities including photography and also sat on the board for the Salmon Arm Museum. He was a history buff and chronicled the history of the area in unpublished works. Wilson was an amateur archaeologist, collector and rockhound and had a keen interest in First Nations cultures. He was also involved in running the Adams River Sockeye Run programme, worked for the Co-op movement and was a former director of the Credit Union.

John Allan Wilson
MS 120 · Person

John (Jack) Allan Wilson (1906 – 1983) was born in Virden, Manitoba. He moved to Salmon Arm in 1912, with his parents George and Alice Wilson, becoming one of the area’s pioneer residents. Wilson was educated in Salmon Arm and attended school in South Canoe.

On October 06, 1939, John married Tappen resident Marguerite (Peggy) Annala (1913-2002). Together, they had two children: John Allan and Robert George.

Wilson first worked as a banker, but then became a teacher and taught school in Kelowna, Princeton, and Salmon Arm from 1940-1958. Wilson also taught elementary school in the Salmon Arm area, including the schools Lee Creek, Tappen Valley, and Carlin.

As an active community member, Wilson enjoyed a variety of activities including photography and also sat on the board for the Salmon Arm Museum. He was a history buff and chronicled the history of the area in unpublished works. Wilson was an amateur archaeologist, collector and rockhound and had a keen interest in First Nations cultures. He was also involved in running the Adams River Sockeye Run programme, worked for the Co-op movement and was a former director of the Credit Union.

John Allan Wilson
MS 120 · Person · 1906-1983

John (Jack) Allan Wilson (1906 – 1983) was born in Virden, Manitoba. He moved to Salmon Arm in 1912, with his parents George and Alice Wilson, becoming one of the area’s pioneer residents. Wilson was educated in Salmon Arm and attended school in South Canoe.

On October 06, 1939, John married Tappen resident Marguerite (Peggy) Annala (1913-2002). Together, they had two children: John Allan and Robert George.

Wilson first worked as a banker, but then became a teacher and taught school in Kelowna, Princeton, and Salmon Arm from 1940-1958. Wilson also taught elementary school in the Salmon Arm area, including the schools Lee Creek, Tappen Valley, and Carlin.

As an active community member, Wilson enjoyed a variety of activities including photography and also sat on the board for the Salmon Arm Museum. He was a history buff and chronicled the history of the area in unpublished works. Wilson was an amateur archaeologist, collector and rockhound and had a keen interest in First Nations cultures. He was also involved in running the Adams River Sockeye Run programme, worked for the Co-op movement and was a former director of the Credit Union.

Turner, Ronald Hudson
MS 122 (Salmon Arm Museum) · Person · 1913-2013

Ronald Hudson Turner was one of the sons in the R. Turner and Sons Ltd. business in Salmon Arm BC. He was born in Salmon Arm in 1913 to Robert and Maude (McGuire) Turner, who were early residents involved in the orchard industry. With his brother Edward “Eddie” Charles, Ronald Turner remained active in the orchard business but he also worked as a surveyor in the province.

In 1946, Ronald married June Lillian Gillis from Sicamous and they then had a son, Robert Gerald Turner, and daughters, Glenna Harriet and Janice Louise.

After the death of his father in 1950, Ronald and Eddie Turner carried on the R. Turner and Sons Ltd. business. It was becoming more involved with real estate transactions as the orchard business declined following the “Big Freeze” of 1950. After the death of Eddie Turner, this business continued with other family members, including Eddie’s widow, Eileen.

Ronald remained living on Turner orchard property until his death in 2013.

Florence Farmer
MS 123 · Person

Florence Gertrude Shirley Pauling was born in London, England March 23, 1917. She came to Canada in 1919, arriving in Agassiz BC with her mother Gertrude Ethel Shirley (Feb 22, 1882-Mar 22, 1975). Florence's mother was born in Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, England, and had married Robert Pauling (April 2, 1869-Jan 31, 1960), a butcher by trade and a soldier in World War I. Florence's father had immigrated ahead of his wife and daughter and opened a butcher shop in Armstrong BC.

By October 1919 the family were living in Salmon Arm BC, where her uncle, George Shirley, was living.

Florence attended the Central School on Harris Street until Grade 3, when the family moved to Armstrong for several years, then to Kamloops in 1930, where she completed Grade 9, and finally back to the South Canoe area of Salmon Arm.

After Grade 9, Florence quit school to help at home and to work at casual labour jobs in the local orchards.

In September 1936, Florence married Frank Farmer of Salmon Arm at her parents’ home, both declaring Anglican as their denomination. The young couple went to reside on Martin Road (now 10th Ave SE), on the Elgood place.

In November 1939, this couple had a son, Richard Charles Farmer. When Richard started school in 1945, the family had moved to 3rd Ave SE.

Frank and Florence Farmer owned the Front Street Grocery, which operated for about eleven years. In 1942 Frank Farmer was elected Alderman and Mayor in 1944.

The couple divorced in 1950. Florence began to work for the SAFE grocery emporium and then later with Salmon Arm Meat and Produce, later Askew’s grocery, and remained a close friend of the Askew family. For many years, she was associated with James Maxwell Honey, though never married. Florence was an active member of Salmon Arm United Church, Salmon Arm Museum and the Okanagan Historical Society. She died October 12, 2008 at Salmon Arm BC.

Florence Farmer
MS 123 · Person · 1917-2008

Florence Gertrude Shirley Pauling was born in London, England March 23, 1917. She came to Canada in 1919, arriving in Agassiz BC with her mother Gertrude Ethel Shirley (Feb 22, 1882-Mar 22, 1975). Florence's mother was born in Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, England, and had married Robert Pauling (April 2, 1869-Jan 31, 1960), a butcher by trade and a soldier in World War I. Florence's father had immigrated ahead of his wife and daughter and opened a butcher shop in Armstrong BC.

By October 1919 the family were living in Salmon Arm BC, where her uncle, George Shirley, was living.

Florence attended the Central School on Harris Street until Grade 3, when the family moved to Armstrong for several years, then to Kamloops in 1930, where she completed Grade 9, and finally back to the South Canoe area of Salmon Arm.

After Grade 9, Florence quit school to help at home and to work at casual labour jobs in the local orchards.

In September 1936, Florence married Frank Farmer of Salmon Arm at her parents’ home, both declaring Anglican as their denomination. The young couple went to reside on Martin Road (now 10th Ave SE), on the Elgood place.

In November 1939, this couple had a son, Richard Charles Farmer. When Richard started school in 1945, the family had moved to 3rd Ave SE.

Frank and Florence Farmer owned the Front Street Grocery, which operated for about eleven years. In 1942 Frank Farmer was elected Alderman and Mayor in 1944.

The couple divorced in 1950. Florence began to work for the SAFE grocery emporium and then later with Salmon Arm Meat and Produce, later Askew’s grocery, and remained a close friend of the Askew family. For many years, she was associated with James Maxwell Honey, though never married. Florence was an active member of Salmon Arm United Church, Salmon Arm Museum and the Okanagan Historical Society. She died October 12, 2008 at Salmon Arm BC.

Farmer, Florence Gertrude
MS 123 · Person · 1917-2008

Florence Gertrude Shirley Pauling was born in London, England March 23, 1917. She came to Canada in 1919, arriving in Agassiz BC with her mother Gertrude Ethel Shirley (Feb 22, 1882-Mar 22, 1975). Gertrude Shirley was born in Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, England, who had married Robert Pauling (April 2, 1869-Jan 31, 1960), a butcher by trade and a soldier in World War I. Robert Pauling immigrated ahead of his wife and daughter and opened a butcher shop in Armstrong BC.

By October 1919 the family were living in Salmon Arm BC, where her uncle, George Shirley, was living. Florence attended the Central School on Harris Street until Grade 3, when the family moved to Armstrong for several years, then to Kamloops in 1930, where she completed Grade 9, and finally back to the South Canoe area of Salmon Arm.
After Grade 9, Florence quit school to help at home and to work at casual labour jobs in the local orchards.
In September 1936, Florence married Frank Farmer of Salmon Arm at her parents’ home, both declaring Anglican as their denomination. The young couple went to reside on Martin Road (now 10th Ave SE), on the Elgood place.
In November 1939, this couple had a son, Richard Charles Farmer. When Richard started school in 1945, the family had moved to 3rd Ave SE.

Frank and Florence Farmer owned the Front Street Grocery, which operated for about eleven years. In 1942 Frank Farmer was elected Alderman and Mayor in 1944.

The couple divorced in 1950. Florence began to work for the SAFE grocery emporium and then later with Salmon Arm Meat and Produce, later Askew’s grocery, and remained a close friend of the Askew family. For many years, she was associated with James Maxwell Honey, though never married. Florence was an active member of Salmon Arm United Church, Salmon Arm Museum and the Okanagan Historical Society. She died October 12, 2008 at Salmon Arm BC.

Florence Farmer
MS 123 · Person · 1917-2008

Florence Gertrude Shirley Farmer (nee Pauling) was born in London, England March 23, 1917. She came to Canada in 1919, arriving in Agassiz BC with her mother Gertrude Ethel Shirley (Feb 22, 1882-Mar 22, 1975). Gertrude Shirley was born in Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, England, and had married Robert Pauling (April 2, 1869-Jan 31, 1960), a butcher by trade and a soldier in World War I. Robert Pauling immigrated ahead of his wife and daughter and opened a butcher shop in Armstrong BC.

By October 1919 the family were living in Salmon Arm BC, where Florence's uncle, George Shirley, was living. Florence attended the Central School on Harris Street until Grade 3, when the family moved to Armstrong for several years, then to Kamloops in 1930, where she completed Grade 9, and finally back to the South Canoe area of Salmon Arm.

Florence quit school after Grade 9 to help at home and to work at casual labour jobs in the local orchards. In September 1936, she married Frank Farmer of Salmon Arm at her parents’ home, both declaring Anglican as their denomination. The young couple went to reside on Martin Road (now 10th Ave SE), on the Elgood place.

In November 1939, this couple had a son, Richard Charles Farmer. When Richard started school in 1945, the family had moved to 3rd Ave SE. Frank and Florence Farmer owned the Front Street Grocery, which operated for about eleven years. In 1942 Frank Farmer was elected Alderman and Mayor in 1944. The couple divorced in 1950.

Florence began to work for the SAFE grocery emporium and then later with Salmon Arm Meat and Produce, later Askew’s grocery, and remained a close friend of the Askew family. For many years, she was associated with James Maxwell Honey, though never married. Florence was an active member of Salmon Arm United Church, Salmon Arm Museum and the Okanagan Historical Society. She died October 12, 2008 at Salmon Arm BC.

Meek, Mary Fawcett
MS 128 (Salmon Arm Museum) · Person · 1903-1987

Mary Fawcett resided in Salmon Arm. She was a teacher in the area and was photographed with many teacher friends. She married Michael Meek and had no children.

Gladys M. Johnston
MS 135 · Person · 1906-1983

Gladys Marie Foster Johnston was born in Birch Hills near Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. Her parents, William and Catherine Isabella Harriet Foster, acquired W. Armstrong's farm in Silver Creek in November, 1907. The fosters had five children: Harvey, Charlie, Jenny, Gladys and Dorothy. Seaman Harvey Foster died in 1918 in Halifax Harbour.

At age 19, Gladys Foster returned to Prince Albert, SK and took a painting class in Saskatoon. In 1926 she married Ernest Johnston (1881-1968) from Sheffield, England, twenty-four years her senior. Ernest Johnston had a homestead in the Cariboo. No record of Johnston's homestead has been found in the Western Land Grant database.

The Johnstons had three sons: Harvey Norquay, Laurence, and William.

Gladys Johnston helped support the family by writing, painting, housekeeping, and child minding for others. She literally pedaled her paintings door-to-door, traveling by bicycle and charging $5 to $15 a piece for them. Later in life she took a short course in nursing at U.B.C. and ran a small nursing home in Salmon Arm. Gladys' interests also included reading tea cups and playing piano for services at St. John's Anglican Church in Salmon Arm. She died in 1983.

Gladys Johnston's work was shown at the Vancouver Art Gallery three times. She was also "discovered" by artist Chris Cran. In 1988 he co-curated an art show with Patricia Ainslie at the Glenbow in Calgary. 52 pieces of Gladys' art were shown with her sons, grandchildren and great-grandchildren all in attendance for the opening.

Johnston, Gladys M.
MS 135 (Salmon Arm Museum) · Person · 1906-1983

Gladys Marie Foster Johnston was born in Birch Hills near Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. Her parents, William and Catherine Isabella Harriet Foster, acquired W. Armstrong’s farm in Silver Creek in November, 1907. The Fosters had five children: Harvey, Charlie, Jenny, Gladys and Dorothy. Seaman Harvey Foster died in 1918 in Halifax Harbour.

At age 19, Gladys Foster returned to Prince Albert, SK and took a painting class in Saskatoon. In 1926 she married Ernest Johnston (1881-1968) from Sheffield, England, twenty-four years her senior. Ernest Johnston had a homestead in the Cariboo. No record of Johnston’s homestead has been found in Western Land Grant database.

The Johnstons had 3 sons: Harvey Norquay, Laurence and William.

Gladys Johnston helped support the family by writing, painting, housekeeping, and child minding for others. She literally pedalled her paintings door-to-door, travelling by bicycle and charging $5 to $15 a piece for them. Later in life she took a short course in nursing at U.B.C. and ran a small nursing home in Salmon Arm. Gladys’ interests also included reading tea cups and playing piano for services at St. John’s Anglican Church in Salmon Arm. She died in 1983.

Gladys Johnston’s work was shown at the Vancouver Art Gallery three times. She was also “discovered” by artist Chris Cran. In 1988 he co-curated an art show with Patricia Ainslie at the Glenbow in Calgary. 53 pieces of Gladys’ art were shown with her sons, grandchildren and great-grandchildren all in attendance for the opening.

McEwen, Margaret
MS 137 · Person · 1922-1981

Margaret Ivy McEwen was born July 11, 1922 to George and Daisy McEwen and raised on a small farm in Grindrod, B.C. Her parents had two more children, Donald and Duncan. When Margaret was six years old, her mother, Daisy, was pregnant with a fourth child and suddenly died. Margaret’s bother Donald McEwen wrote about the tragedy.

“Dad had a job rafting cedar poles from Enderby to Mara for the piling for the bridge. He wasn’t able to get home until late. Mom went to get the cows pasturing...... She had difficulty with them, and tripped in a gopher hole and fell. She was expecting another child, had complications and passed away.” (Oct. 21, 1928)

“In May of 1929 our Aunt Ivy came from [Hampstead, London] England to look after the family. They were married within six months.”

George and Ivy married on August 19, 1929 in Vernon, B.C. and by all accounts Ivy was a loving mother to the three children. Ivy passed away in 1948 and George passed away in 1972.

Margaret attended the school of nursing at Royal Jubilee Hospital in Victoria in 1942 and graduated in 1944. She found work at the Royal Alexandra Hospital in Edmonton, but took a six month leave to nurse her stepmother who was failing. At that time Margaret met Robert (Bob) Douglas Jackson from the Mt. Ida District, Salmon Arm, and the couple were married May 18, 1948. The Jacksons had five children: Barbara, Margaret Elizabeth (Betty), Douglas Ian, and twins Garth and Gordon. All the children were born at the Royal Inland Hospital in Kamloops. Gordon and Garth were premature and Gordon passed away at the age of one month.

While raising her family and working on the farm, Margaret continued to nurse, initially providing homecare to people who needed help. Soon she was asked to come in to work in the hospital when extra help was needed. This became a full time job that she enjoyed. Margaret Jackson died February 26, 2011. Robert (Bob) died December 18, 1990.

Mair, Charles, 1838-1927
MS 14 · Person · 1838-1927

Charles Mair was born at Lanark, Ontario on September 21, 1838. He was educated in Lanark, Perth and spent one year at Queens University, Kingston. He returned to Lanark to spend ten years working for his father. In 1868 Mair had his first volume of poetry "Dreamland and Other Poems" published in Ottawa. While in Ottawa he and George Denison, William Foster, Robert Haliburton and Henry Morgan formed the Canada First Party with the aim of helping Canada attain her rightful place in the British Empire. He married Elizabeth (Eliza) Beth MacKenney in 1869 and together they had seven children - Maude, Florence, Fanny, George, Cecil, Mabel, and Bessie. Charles Mair and his family lived in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan from 1877 to 1884. While there, the Mairs purchased large land holdings and partially supported their family by buying, selling, and renting property. In 1884 Mair moved his family to Windsor, Ontario, where he spent much of his time writing poetry. In 1886, his poetry book "Tecumseh" was published and it became a major work of Canadian literature. Mair returned to Prince Albert in 1886 and remained there, writing and speculating in land until 1892. He spent the following six years in the Okanagan attempting to find some financial security. In 1898 he was appointed to the Ministry of the Interior as an Immigration Officer. In 1899 Charles Mair was appointed English secretary to the Scrip Commission that transferred the Athabasca and Peace River districts to the Dominion of Canada. This commission lasted for four months. As a result of this work, Charles Mair and Roderick MacFarlane co-authored "Through the MacKenzie Basin", a narrative of the Athabasca and Peace River Treaty Expedition, which was published in 1908. He spent the next five years in Winnipeg, and then moved to Lethbridge, Coutts, and finally to Fort Steele. He spent the years 1912-1921 as the Customs and Immigration Officer at Fort Steele and retired from government service in 1921. Charles Mair lived with his daughter Fanny in Calgary until 1924. The years 1924 to 1927 were spent in Victoria where he died on July 7, 1927.

Herald, Dr. Dundas
MS 140 · Person · 1870-1951

Dr. Dundas Herald, son of Rev. James Herald, was born at Dundas, Ontario in 1870 and was awarded his medical degree at Queen’s University in 1891. Dundas and his brother Wilson registered with the BC College of Physicians within the year. Both brothers practiced in Vancouver before Wilson moved to Ashcroft, BC and Dundas moved to Quesnelle Forks in the Cariboo. After 1901 the brothers established a cattle ranch at Medicine Hat, Alberta.

In 1905 Dundas married Edith Phyllis Grant and their children Jessie Edith (1905 ) and James Barclay [Buster] (1907) were born in Medicine Hat. A third child, Arthur Dundas, was born in Salmon Arm in 1909.

Edith Phyllis Grant was born October 18, 1875 to Joseph and Anne Grant (nee Schroder) at Corona, Ontario. Her family moved to Walsh, Alberta in 1900 to ranch.

In 1906 the Heralds purchased “Bonny Bray” a 160-acre farm and home from John Reinecker near Sunnybrae and moved to the Shuswap. Dundas Herald never practiced medicine in the Shuswap.

The Heralds lived in isolation. Children Buster, Arthur, and Jessie were educated by their father at home and without the guidance of a school curriculum.

The family raised Jersey cows and took their milk across the lake every two or three days. They also made butter for sale – 70 to 80 pounds a week. Power for churning the cream into butter was provided by a water wheel. The Herald family picked and shipped cherries and raspberries for a few years, but gave that up and concentrated their efforts growing hay.

Dundas Herald died in 1951 and was survived by his wife and children. Their Sunnybrae property was sold to the provincial government and became a park in 1975.

Gordon Priestman
MS 146 · Person · 1936-2003

According to his obituary, long time Salmon Arm Observer editor Gordon (Gord) Priestman was born, August 4, 1936, and raised in Toronto and Muskoka, Ont.

After completing his education, Gordon travelled in industrial sales for several years, freelance writing as a sideline. In 1964 he moved to British Columbia and, after a brief stay in Vancouver, accepted a post as reporter/editor for the Merritt Herald. A year-and-a-half later he became editor of the Powell River News in addition to two smaller papers.

The family moved to Salmon Arm April 1, 1967 when Gordon became editor of the Salmon Arm Observer, a position he was to hold for most of the next 33 years. During that period his column, “Observations,” was a popular feature and both the paper and Gordon were recipients of a number of newspaper industry awards.

A lifelong Social Democrat, he took a leave of absence to run for the NDP Party in the 1986 provincial election. He then returned to the Observer, retiring for health reasons in December 1998.

Gordon was always interested in the arts—writing, music and painting. He loved the outdoors, including camping, canoeing and observing nature. Until middle years he was active in a number of sports. He was involved with numerous local organizations, was a member of the Salmar Community Association, was a life member of the Fall Fair Society and a director of the Shuswap Community Foundation.

Gordon died August 4, 2003. He was survived by Faye Fawcett, his wife and companion of 19 years, his three children and his beloved pets.

Ruth Adair Peterson
MS 148 · Person · 1921-2008

When Ruth Adair Peterson (nee Brooke) died August 1, 2008 in Reno, Nevada, a succession of remarkable events repatriated to Salmon Arm a collection of significant paintings which celebrate a lovely story, a loving family, and its community.

More than three hundred paintings by Ruth’s father, Arthur Adair Brooke, were found under her bed wrapped in a cotton pillow slip and tied with a green ribbon. They came “home”. The one-of-a-kind collection was archival in every sense of the word. It spanned an important period of time and documented rural life in the Mt. Ida District of Salmon Arm.

Ruth’s story begins in 1921. Life on the Brookes’ farm, Asterfield, was unexpectedly interrupted with her birth. She was a fourth child and the first daughter to middle aged parents Arthur Adair and Annie Florence Brooke. She was given her mother’s maiden name and raised like an only child, adored by her adult brothers. Family members tell us her parents were strict Baptists. Ruth left home to attend business school in Calgary. It was there she met the love of her life, a divorced American baseball player named Bill Peterson. Ruth followed Bill to the States and they were married in 1951. Ruth and her new husband lived in Oakland, California and Reno, Nevada. The couple had a long marriage until Bill’s death in 1985.

But the story really began with the artist. Born in Rome in 1874, Arthur Adair Brooke had a long journey to Salmon Arm, British Columbia. The eldest child of Arthur Swindells and Amelia Adair Brooke had little memory at the age of two of moving with his family to Switzerland. His father was a professional watercolour artist and supported the family of 9 surviving children by painting landscapes.

When A.A. Brooke finished secondary school he was sent to England before emigrating to Canada in 1890. The first stop in Canada was Manitoba where he learned to farm under the tutelage of Joseph Merry at the Barnsley Farm Home. Four years later, Brooke began working his own farm.

Brooke married Annie Florence Ruth in 1898. Their first son, Harold Arthur, was born at Barnsley two years later. The family moved to Didsbury, Alberta, and two more sons joined the family, Ralph Edward in 1902 and Ernest Cuthbert in 1903. A.A. Brooke worked a homestead and received his Western Land Grant in 1904.

Alberta was not to be the end of the journey. Brooke sold the homestead and its improvements, and moved the household west after purchasing 60 acres of the Goforth farm in the Mt. Ida District near Salmon Arm. They arrived by train in 1907 with two loads of settlers’ effects and set up residence, naming their new home Asterfield.

Still adjusting to retirement, the couple moved again, this time south to another farming community, Cloverdale in the Fraser Valley. Arthur Adair spent his remaining years painting.

Annie Florence passed away December 6th, 1957. After her death, Arthur ached with loneliness and moved to Siska Lodge at Lytton, B.C. to be with his son Harold. He kept busy painting watercolours to sell in the Lodge’s coffee shop.

Arthur Adair was a prolific artist and left a legacy of a significant body of work. The farmer artist sketched images all his life, using his drawings as inspiration for later watercolours. His landscapes depict Switzerland, Ireland, Manitoba, Alberta, Alaska, and British Columbia. Numerous watercolours and sketches are held in private collections, at the Glenbow Museum in Calgary, the Dufferin Historical Society Museum in Carman, Manitoba and the Salmon Arm Museum. But his best work is said to be Ruth’s baby books that document his daughter's early life.

Arthur died thirteen months after Annie on January 13, 1959.

McDougall, R.J., 1888-1982
MS 15 · Person · 1888-1982

R.J. McDougall was an independent mining engineer operating out of Fort Steele and serving East Kootenay mines.

June Griswold
MS 152 · Person · 2005-2013

June Stacel [1926 – 2013] was born in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho. June spent her youth in logging camps in Idaho, Washington, and Oregon.
In 1952 June met logger Harry Griswold in Oregon. They were married 1 month later and the marriage lasted 54 years. The couple had 2 children, Nola and Julia.

June was Curator at the S.S. Moyie in Kaslo and was involved with the Kootenay Lake Historical Society. The couple moved to the Shuswap in 1990 and became involved with the Spallumcheen Pioneer Power Club.

June played a key role developing the Seed Savers Group, was a supporter of the Salmon Arm Community Band, and the Salmon Arm and Shuswap Lake Agricultural Association (Fall Fair).

MS 16 · Person · 1835-1875

Arthur Thomas Bushby was Registrar General, Postmaster General, and a judge in New Westminster, B.C.

Esling, William K.
MS 20 · Person · 1869 - 1946

William K. Esling was born in Philadelphia in 1869. In 1896 he moved to the Trail Creek Area and Rossland due to the mining boom. In 1899, Esling purchased the Rossland Record, which was an evening paper, and in 1905 he acquired the Rossland Miner, which he published as a morning daily. In 1920, he became the conservative nominee for British Columbia and was subsequently elected. He redeemed the West Kootenay seat in 1925, 1926, 1930, 1935, and 1940. In 1936 he started a fund for children with vision impairments. He died in 1946.

Duncan, Frank
MS 21 (Salmon Arm Museum) · Person · 1878-1970

Francis (Frank) Duncan was born in Missouri in 1878. As a child, he and his parents lived in California and Texas. After the death of his parents, Duncan returned to Missouri to live with his grandparents. Duncan trained as a photographer, returned to Texas to work and then decided to "go up into Canada fishing."

Duncan arrived in Salmon Arm in 1913 and opened a photography studio above the Kualt store. He was a widower at the time and sent for his daughter, Kathleen. Neighbours, the Reilly family, took care of the young girl at Tappen, while Duncan tried to make a living. To supplement his studio work, Duncan sold subscriptions to the Observer and bartered exchanges for his catches of fish.

The Salmon Arm Observer notes that Duncan was an experienced photographer when he arrived in the area. He specialized in railroad and newspaper photography, and had worked throughout Canada, the United States and Mexico.

The Salmon Arm Observer commissioned Duncan to take photographs of all parts of the Shuswap. Interestingly, on June 18, 1914 the editors note that Mr. Duncan had a hydroplane that he used on Shuswap Lake. Duncan later worked in Klamath Falls, Oregon before moving to Texas. He made homes in Presidio, Terlingua and, finally, Marfa in 1916. According to The Big Bend Sentinel, Duncan considered himself primarily a prospector, with photographic skills. He approached ranchers in Texas, asking to prospect, but was usually denied access to their land. Then, as a back up, Duncan offered to take portraits of the ranchers' families and landscapes of their ranches. The Marfa Presidio County Museum houses 2,200 of Duncan's glass and film negatives from the region. Duncan loved hunting, fishing and the outdoors. He died July 9, 1970 at Brownfield, Texas and was buried at Mt. Olive Cemetery in Big Spring, Texas. Duncan was 91.

Mary Lois Esau
MS 23 (Salmon Arm Museum) · Person · 1993

Mary Esau studied history of musical theatre in England and the United States prior to studying musical theatre in Canada. Mary Lois Esau earned a B.F.A. at the University of Lethbridge in 1990 and a Master of Arts degree in the Department of Theatre at the University of Victoria in 1993.

Esau discovered the name of Salmon Arm’s John Leonard in the Book History of Music in British Columbia: 1850-1950 by Dale McIntosh and began searching for Leonard’s operettas. Leonard was a writer of original operetta material and quite possibly British Columbia’s first composer of light opera. Leonard wrote works specifically to meet the needs and abilities of his singers and actors. Deciding Leonard was a subject worthy of further research, Esau set out to write her Master’s thesis on Leonard’s career in music, calling it John F. Leonard and His High School Operettas.