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authority records
New Westminster

Frank and Laura Marshall

  • MS 19
  • Family
  • 1939-1983

David Franklin (Frank) Marshall was born April 16, 1900 in Listowel, Ontario. While working as a reporter for the New Westminster Columbian he met Laura Bell Burroughs. The couple married June 14, 1928 and had one child, Denis Paul Marshall in 1933.

Laura was born in Kent County, Ontario February 27, 1899. Her family moved to Chaplin, Saskatchewan, where her father was a general merchant. The family’s next move was to New Westminster in 1921.

The Marshalls made their home at the coast for 16 years. Frank Marshall concluded his 23-year career as a reporter in 1944, purchased the Salmon Arm Observer, and settled into Shuswap life.

It did not take Frank Marshall long to become immersed in his new role. In 1946 Frank was the Charter President of the local Rotary Club, he joined the board of the BC Division of the Canadian Weekly Newspapers’ Association, and successfully ran for alderman - a position he held from 1947 to 1953.

In 1946 Frank was also elected to the Board of the Salmon Arm Community Co-operative Association (later named the Salmar Community Association). The Association’s goal was to buy the Rex Theatre and raise money for a living memorial to those who did not return from the recent World War. The group later built a new community theatre, paid off that debt, and, with proceeds from ticket sales, raised funds for the Salmon Arm Memorial Arena. The community asset was completed in 1958.

Frank Marshall was busy on several fronts. He built a new building for the Observer in 1947 and had a new home constructed on Harris Street in 1948 just a few blocks from the downtown core and Observer building.

When Frank died in 1964 after a lengthy illness, Laura Marshall continued in the family business. Their son, Denis Marshall, took over the position of Publisher. The two capably published the weekly paper until 1976 when it was sold to Lynne and Ian Wickett.

Laura retired to Victoria and died in 1988.

Marshall, D. F.

  • MS 19
  • Family
  • 1939-1983

David Franklin (Frank) Marshall was born April 16, 1900 in Listowel, Ontario. While working as a reporter for the New Westminster Columbian he met Laura Bell Burroughs. The couple married June 14, 1928 and had one child, Denis Paul Marshall in 1933.

Laura was born in Kent County, Ontario February 27, 1899. Her family moved to Chaplin, Saskatchewan, where her father was a general merchant. The family’s next move was to New Westminster in 1921.

The Marshalls made their home at the coast for 16 years. Frank Marshall concluded his 23-year career as a reporter in 1944, purchased the Salmon Arm Observer, and settled into Shuswap life.

It did not take Frank Marshall long to become immersed in his new role. In 1946 Frank was the Charter President of the local Rotary Club, he joined the board of the BC Division of the Canadian Weekly Newspapers’ Association, and successfully ran for alderman - a position he held from 1947 to 1953.

In 1946 Frank was also elected to the Board of the Salmon Arm Community Co-operative Association (later named the Salmar Community Association). The Association’s goal was to buy the Rex Theatre and raise money for a living memorial to those who did not return from the recent World War. The group later built a new community theatre, paid off that debt, and, with proceeds from ticket sales, raised funds for the Salmon Arm Memorial Arena. The community asset was completed in 1958.

Frank Marshall was busy on several fronts. He built a new building for the Observer in 1947 and had a new home constructed on Harris Street in 1948 just a few blocks from the downtown core and Observer building.

When Frank died in 1964 after a lengthy illness, Laura Marshall continued in the family business. Their son, Denis Marshall, took over the position of Publisher. The two capably published the weekly paper until 1976 when it was sold to Lynne and Ian Wickett.

Laura retired to Victoria and died in 1988.

Bartling, Hedwig

  • Priv 63
  • Person
  • [1907?]-1993

Rev. Dr. Hedwig Dorothea Henrietta Bartling was born in Germany. As a young child, she emigrated with her family from Germany to Canada, settling in Saskatchewan, just a year before the First World War. In 1933, she was engaged by the Woman's Missionary Society (W.M.S.) of The United Church of Canada to work among the Ukrainian people in northern Alberta. In 1942, she went to Lethbridge to work among the Japanese-Canadian internees. After the war, Bartling worked first at the Chinese Christian Community Centre in Victoria, B.C. (1950-1951), followed by several years at Steveston United Church in Richmond, helping build the integrated Caucasian-Japanese congregation (1952-1956). Following three years at Queen's Avenue United Church in New Westminster (1960-1962), and studies at Union College, she was ordained. Hedwig Bartling died in 1993.

Fong, Dickman

  • Person
  • 1860-1946

Rev. Fong Dickman, originally known as Fong, Tak Man, was born in 1860 in Yan Ping, Kwangtung [Canton or Guangdong], China. He came to Canada in 1884 to seek a better life. Initially Mr. Fong made a living by driving stagecoaches between Vancouver and New Westminster, B.C. While attending a mission school at night, first in New Westminster and subsequently in Vancouver, Fong developed a keen interest in Christianity. He was baptized at the Princess Street Methodist Church in Vancouver, and appointed to the Chinese Methodist Church in Nanaimo in 1898 as a missionary at large. At that time, his name was Anglicized to “Dickman.” In 1906, Fong Dickman was transferred to Vancouver to set up and produce the Wa-Ying Yat-Po, (华英日报, the Chinese-English Daily Newspaper, 1906-1909), one of the very early (if not the first) Christian newspapers in the Chinese language published in Canada. After 25 years of service, Fong Dickman was ordained by the Methodist Church of Canada in 1923. During his lifetime, he served in pastoral ministry at Nanaimo (1898-1906 and 1913-1921), Vancouver (1906-1913), New Westminster (1922-1930), and Edmonton (1930-1939). Rev. Fong Dickman retired in 1939, living in New Westminster until 1942, then residing in Vancouver from 1943 until his death on April 10, 1946.

Fong Dickman married Jane Chang in Victoria in 1899, and the couple had four daughters: Lavina Fong Dickman, who later became Lavina Cheng; Esther Fong Dickman; Anna Fong Dickman, who became Anna Lam; and Mary Fong Dickman (who died at a very young age). Aside from their loyal assistance with the church work, Anna was the first Chinese Canadian to become a registered nurse in B.C. and Esther, a school teacher in Vancouver. Mrs. Fong Dickman died in 1927. Beyond missionary work, Rev. Fong Dickman enjoyed creative writing, featuring early Chinese immigrants from his pastoral perspective. Rev. Fong Dickman was a philanthropist, who was noted to have supported a missionary in the city of Fat Shaan in Fong Dickman’s native province in south China.