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authority records
Corporate body Business and commerce

Shuswap Narrows Lodge

  • MA 150
  • Corporate body
  • 1945-

Shuswap Narrows Lodge was operated by Frank and Kaye Oben from 1945-1952. Frank Edwin Oben was born on February 25th, 1913 in Vancouver to Mary McConicky and Edwin Alfred Oben.

On May 11th, 1937, at twenty-four years old, Frank Oben married a divorced bookkeeper two years his senior named Kathleen Law in Vancouver B.C.

Frank Oben learned the craftsmanship of baking from his father, and owned a bakery on Homer Street, Vancouver. During the Great War, Mr. Oben inherited the bakery and subsequently provided food provisions to armed workforce stationed in the Vancouver area.

In the summer of 1945, Frank and Kathleen Oben moved from Vancouver to the B.C. Interior where they owned and ran Shuswap Narrows Fishing Lodge in Eagle Bay. It was an extremely successful business endeavor due to his pragmatic personality and business savvy intellect, a favorite place amongst nature aficionados throughout the Pacific Northwest.

On June 11th 1952, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Oben sold their property, the Shuswap Narrows Fishing Lodge, to a Vancouver couple: Mr. and Mrs. Perrault.

In its aftermath, Kathleen and Frank Oben ended their marriage. Hereinafter, he remarried Joan Mary Dunn and had an efficacious career in Real Estate and property investing as a salesman in Salmon Arm.

Since 1945, Frank Oben was a resident of Salmon Arm, and has been a paramount participant in community life. Furthermore, he was the former president of the curling club, President of the Okanagan Real Estate Board, a Rotary club director, a member with the Shuswap Power Squadron, and a fervent golfer.

Tragically, on June 15th 1987 at the age of 75 Frank Oben committed suicide. The immediate cause of death was a gunshot to his head, and the antecedent cause was a fractured skull and lacerated brain.

The people who played a significant role in his life are; his former wife Kathleen Law, his second wife and widow Joan Mary Dunn, daughter Nicole Marshall, brother Edwin Albert Oben Jr., nephew Grant, and niece Joanne.

Granite Trading Association

  • MS 138
  • Corporate body
  • 1915 -1920

On April 27, 1915 a group of people met to form the Granite Trading Co-operative Association.

The association had its beginnings two years before in 1913 when a group met to form the Tappen Farmers’ Exchange. The Exchange was created to handle and sell farm produce. Henry Calhoun, J.A. Carlin, William Sanderson, J. Fleming, Gust Annala, J. Mikkelson, and C.W. Mobley erected a small building on the C.P.R. right-of-way and had C.P.R. operator Barney Kellogg paint a sign on the building. C.W. Mobley was appointed the manager, secretary-treasurer, and one-person staff.

The group affiliated with the Salmon Arm Farmers’ Exchange and Okanagan United Growers. Settlers in the area started asking the Exchange to bring in consumer goods. Flour and feed arrived by the carload and unloaded in the Calhoun warehouse located on the C.P.R. right-of-way. Settlers could order groceries or farm equipment, combine their bulk orders and receive wholesale shipping rates.

The co-operative impacted local store owner and businessman H.C. Banks. His store had been serving customers in the area since 1907. Banks contacted the C.P.R. requesting to have the co-operative restrained from doing business on the C.P.R. right-of-way. Settlers were unhappy with Banks and the members of the cooperative reacted by deciding to get into the retail trade. The first item of business was to incorporate under the Co-operative Association Act. In a spirit of fairness to Mr. Banks, the group offered to buy him out, offering him $900 for his building and well, to buy his stock at costs plus shipping, and to pay him $75 for his share in the co-operative telephone system that operated out of the store.

The sale was structured $400 cash down for the building and $300 for the stock. The balance of payments bore 8% interest.

The name Granite Trading Association was adopted, taken the name of Granite Mountain. The founding directors were C.W. Mobley, Henry Calhoun, Wm Sanderson, Gust Annala, and J.A. Carling. Mr. Calhoun was elected president and Mr. Mobley the secretary.

The Association is one of the oldest operating consumer co-operatives in the province and is famous for its outsized ice cream cones.

Granite Trading Association

  • MS 138
  • Corporate body
  • 1915-

On April 27, 1915 a group of people met to form the Granite Trading Co-operative Association.

The association had its beginnings two years before in 1913 when a group met to form the Tappen Farmers’ Exchange. The Exchange was created to handle and sell farm produce. Henry Calhoun, J.A. Carlin, William Sanderson, J. Fleming, Gust Annala, J. Mikkelson, and C.W. Mobley erected a small building on the C.P.R. right-of-way and had C.P.R. operator Barney Kellogg paint a sign on the building. C.W. Mobley was appointed the manager, secretary-treasurer, and one-person staff.

The group affiliated with the Salmon Arm Farmers’ Exchange and Okanagan United Growers. Settlers in the area started asking the Exchange to bring in consumer goods. Flour and feed arrived by the carload and unloaded in the Calhoun warehouse located on the C.P.R. right-of-way. Settlers could order groceries or farm equipment, combine their bulk orders and receive wholesale shipping rates.

The co-operative impacted local store owner and businessman H.C. Banks. His store had been serving customers in the area since 1907. Banks contacted the C.P.R. requesting to have the co-operative restrained from doing business on the C.P.R. right-of-way. Settlers were unhappy with Banks and the members of the cooperative reacted by deciding to get into the retail trade. The first item of business was to incorporate under the Co-operative Association Act. In a spirit of fairness to Mr. Banks, the group offered to buy him out, offering him $900 for his building and well, to buy his stock at costs plus shipping, and to pay him $75 for his share in the co-operative telephone system that operated out of the store.

The sale was structured $400 cash down for the building and $300 for the stock. The balance of payments bore 8% interest.

The name Granite Trading Association was adopted, taken the name of Granite Mountain. The founding directors were C.W. Mobley, Henry Calhoun, Wm Sanderson, Gust Annala, and J.A. Carling. Mr. Calhoun was elected president and Mr. Mobley the secretary.

The Association is one of the oldest operating consumer co-operatives in the province and is famous for its outsized ice cream cones.

Co-operative Granite Trading Association

  • MS 138
  • Corporate body
  • 1920-

On April 27, 1915 a group of people met to form the Granite Trading Co-operative Association.

The association had its beginnings two years before in 1913 when a group met to form the Tappen Farmers’ Exchange. The Exchange was created to handle and sell farm produce. Henry Calhoun, J.A. Carlin, William Sanderson, J. Fleming, Gust Annala, J. Mikkelson, and C.W. Mobley erected a small building on the C.P.R. right-of-way and had C.P.R. operator Barney Kellogg paint a sign on the building. C.W. Mobley was appointed the manager, secretary-treasurer, and one-person staff.

The group affiliated with the Salmon Arm Farmers’ Exchange and Okanagan United Growers. Settlers in the area started asking the Exchange to bring in consumer goods. Flour and feed arrived by the carload and unloaded in the Calhoun warehouse located on the C.P.R. right-of-way. Settlers could order groceries or farm equipment, combine their bulk orders and receive wholesale shipping rates.

The co-operative impacted local store owner and businessman H.C. Banks. His store had been serving customers in the area since 1907. Banks contacted the C.P.R. requesting to have the co-operative restrained from doing business on the C.P.R. right-of-way. Settlers were unhappy with Banks and the members of the cooperative reacted by deciding to get into the retail trade. The first item of business was to incorporate under the Co-operative Association Act. In a spirit of fairness to Mr. Banks, the group offered to buy him out, offering him $900 for his building and well, to buy his stock at costs plus shipping, and to pay him $75 for his share in the co-operative telephone system that operated out of the store.

The sale was structured $400 cash down for the building and $300 for the stock. The balance of payments bore 8% interest.

The name Granite Trading Association was adopted, taken the name of Granite Mountain. The founding directors were C.W. Mobley, Henry Calhoun, Wm Sanderson, Gust Annala, and J.A. Carling. Mr. Calhoun was elected president and Mr. Mobley the secretary.

The Association is one of the oldest operating consumer co-operatives in the province and is famous for its outsized ice cream cones.

Tappen and District Credit Union

  • MS 147
  • Corporate body
  • 1950-1969

The Tappen and District Credit Union [TDCU] was incorporated under the Credit Unions Act on the 31st of October, 1950.

The supervisory committee and treasurer were given instructions by T.A. Switzer, Inspector of Credit Unions. The responsibilities of the directors were also outlined.

According to the organization’s first President, John Allan (Jack) Wilson, the group first met as a study group to discuss the formation of a Credit Union. Once incorporated, the members were faced with the initial expense of $50 for bookkeeping supplies and feared that it might be some time before this expense was recovered. Unsure of how the community would respond to the venture, growth was expected to be slow.

Within three months the new TDCU had made three loans and within six months the bookkeeping expense was recovered. The TDCU joined the B.C. Credit Union League and the B.C. Central Credit Union. Bonding insurance was the next expense, including a Treasurers’ bond. By the end of the first year, the new Credit Union had earned enough to pay a 3% dividend on share capital.

Reporting on the first year of operation were Jack Wilson, President, Vic Collins, Treasurer, M.M. Wilson, President Supervisory Committee, E.J. Blanc, Chairman Credit Committee.

According to donor Allan Wilson, the Credit Union operated out of Ivy Ford’s home. The registered office was at the Co-op Granite Trading Association in Tappen. Deposits and withdrawals were made at the Co-operative Granite Trading Association (Tappen Co-op) and Meiko Kawase did the paper work on site at the Co-op in between pumping gas and cutting and selling bacon and bologna. Kawase was also the egg grader at the Tappen Co-op.

If a member wanted to borrow money from the Credit Union, they applied to the Credit Committee and met with the committee as a whole. Annual General Meetings were held at Victory Hall in Tappen. The Credit Union in Tappen operated from 1950 until it amalgamated with the Salmon Arm Savings and Credit Union in 1969.

Red Mountain Ski Club

  • Corporate body
  • 1940-1997

In 1947 the Trail and Rossland ski clubs amalgamated and became the Red Mountain Ski Club. Chuck Sankey was the first president. They built the first chair lift on Red Mountain in the same year, which was the record chairlift in all of Western Canada. The wooden tower lift would run until 1973, when it was replaced by a steel tower Mueller lift. At the base of Red Mountain, they built a lodge in the autumn of 1947. Nancy Greene, a two-time winner of the World Cup (1967 and 1968) and Olympic champion (1968), was a member of the club. The club hosted the World Cup in 1968, which was the first time a World Cup was held in Canada. Nancy Greene won the Giant Slalom. In 1965, the Granite Mountain Lift was built in Paradise Basin, on the west side of Granite Mountain. The RMSC again hosted a World Cup even in 1988. In 1989 ownership of RMSC and all its facilities were bought by Eric Skat-Peterson. In 2004 it was sold again, this time to Howard Katkov.

West Kootenay Power and Light Company

  • Corporate body
  • 1896-2002

The West Kootenay Power and Light Company incorporated in 1896, with the construction of the dam and hydro-electric station in Lower Bonnington Falls. They created the longest high voltage line in North America at the time, which transferred power 51km from Bonnington Falls to Rossland BC to supply the mines. The company soon provided power to different sites and homes around the West Kootenays and soon around the East Kootenays and Sourthern British Columbia. The company’s biggest consumer was CM&S (currently known as Teck) which was down the hill in Trail. WKPL had many subsidiaries, such as Rossland Water and Light, South Kootenay Power and Light, Cascade Water, Power, and Light, Northport Power and Light, Sheep Creek Light and Power, and Bonnington Falls Power Co. During WWI, WKPL was bought by CM&S to ensure that it would continue to be supplied with electricity; and in 1987 CM&S – at that point renamed Cominco – sold WKPL to an American Company, Utilicorp United. In 2002 WKPL was taken over by FortisBC. Some notable employees of the company are Lorne A. “LA” Campbell, JD McDonald, and F.A. Lee.

Rossland Post Office

  • Corporate body
  • 1895-

The first Post Office in Rossland was house in David Stussi’s small store at the western end of Columbia Avenue in 1894. The following spring Stussi built the Stussi Block across the street where a small area of 40’ by 10’ was set aside for the post offices. In the fall of 1895, W. Wadds was appointed the Postmaster and he relocated the Post Office to a more commodious space in another commercial building/store – 3rd designated Post Office for Rossland. The third floor of the post office burnt down in the Great Fire in 1929 and was no rebuilt. In 1937, after the death of Postmaster William Wadds, assistant clerk Miss Lowes was appointed acting postmaster. Well-liked by the staff and community, there were no objections to her taking this post. In June of that years, a postal inspector came to Rossland and installed Mrs. K Lloyd as the Postmaster. After much uproar from the community, Mr. L.H. Delmas was appointed Postmaster. In 1962, the Post Office receive an internal “modernization” which included new floors, woodwork, counters, and aluminum lock boxes.

University of British Columbia. Office of Research Services

  • Corporate body
  • 1977-

The UBC Office of Research Services was established in 1977 as Research Administration. Prior to its establishment, the President’s Office oversaw the administration of research activities for the University. In 1983 Research Administration changed its name to Research Services. In 1986 it became Research Services and Industry Liaison. In 1992 it changed its name back to Research Services. Throughout this time Richard D. Spratley managed its activities. In 1983, when Research Administration changed its name, Spratley’s position as Research Administrator was re-named Director.
The Office administers grants and grant programs for the University. A number of separate committees are responsible for administering grant programs and overseeing different types of research. The Human Ethics Committee oversees ethical review procedures for research involving humans. The Animal Care Committee approves research involving animals, while ensuring that animal care guidelines were met. The Biosafety Committee reviews and approves research involving bio-hazardous materials, and also sets safety standards.

Allan Hotel

  • Corporate body
  • 1896 – ca. 1960

In 1897, The Allan Hotel was built on the south-west corner of Columbia and Washington Streets by Mrs. M E Allan. Subsequent owners were Mrs. M E King (1905-1908) , Alexander W Smith and James Clarise Belton (1921) A Robert Stephens in 1922, (illegible writing) and Josh Buchewick (1958) Salty and Horace McCain (1960).

Bank of Montreal (Rossland, B.C.)

  • Corporate body
  • 1896 - [ca. 2000]

The Bank of Montreal was opened in 1896 by A.H. Buchanan, who remained the manager until J.S.C. Fraser moved to the area. It was built by architect Francis Rattenbury, who also designed the Provincial Legislative Buildings. At its first conception in the area, BMO was in competition with four other banks in the area, Bank of British North America, Bank of Toronto, Marchant’s Bank of Halifax, and Bank of British Columbia. The building BMO was in had apartments above to house staff. The Rossland Branch was closed in 2000.